A Brief Walk (tiny shops)

Many people have a small business out of their home. Within just a block one will see dozens of small house shops selling anything from vegetables and eggs to toys or fried food. Often these small shops are run by the mother of the house trying to earn a little extra cash for the household.

If I simply walk five houses down the street in the morning to buy my vegetables, this is what I encounter (keep in mind all shops are basically the front porch of a house): a traditional house on stilts with a mother of three, a small shop selling something like crepes, a helmet shop with a grandpa and grandma working and watching grandchildren, a seamstress (along with his wife and children), another shop selling a peanut dish, a house with a grandmother and grandchildren playing out front, an ally with children riding bikes, another shop selling fried foods, ice drinks, and cookies (with a grandmother, her two daughters, and six grandchildren out front),

Then I get to my vegetable stand.  This lady has a 5 year old and 2 year old twins at her feet as she grinds my coconut down, then bags up some garlic, carrots, and a few eggs for me. That was all simply on the right side of the road, walking not even a tenth of a mile! Almost every morning I walk this route to pick up a few vegetables.  It is expected that I acknowledge, speak, or sometimes sit for a bit with whoever is along my path. This is a very relational culture and the interactions, however long or brief, fuel a warmth and hospitality that is unique to the Lembak people.